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Intraocular Lens Implants

After removing your cataract, your surgeon will insert an artificial lens inside your eye to restore your vision.  There are different options to choose from depending on your visual goals and need for glasses after surgery.  No single lens is perfect, so it's important to discuss your expectations with your surgeon prior to surgery. 

Lens Implant Options

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Monofocal Intraocular Lens

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Toric Astigmatism Correcting Intraocular Lens

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Vivity Extended Depth of Focus (EDoF) Intraocular Lens

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PanOptix Multifocal Intraocular Lens

  • Traditional lens that is covered by your insurance.

  • Monofocal lenses are designed to provide the best possible vision at one distance.

  • This lens does not correct for any astigmatism. 

  • Most people who choose monofocals have their IOLs set for distance vision and use reading glasses for near-vision tasks.

  • Similar in nature to the standard monofocal lens but has built in correction for astigmatism. 

  • The goal with this lens is to provide glasses independence from astigmatism.  You will still need reading glasses to read up close. 

  • Toric lenses are not covered by  your insurance as it's considered cosmetic in nature to eliminate distance glasses, but the Toric lens may reduce the cost of glasses for the rest of your lifetime. 

  • EDoF lenses have an extended area of central vision to provide some intermediate vision (car dashboard) in addition to distance vision. 

  • This lens is a good option for patients who want less dependence on glasses and may have minor eye issues or in patients who have had LASIK surgery and want some glasses independence. 

  • With this lens you may still need readers and you may have glare and halos around lights at night. 

  • EDoF lenses are not covered by your insurance as it's considered cosmetic in nature to eliminate glasses but it may reduce the cost of glasses for the rest of your lifetime. 

  • Multifocal lenses are made similar to bifocals/trifocals to help with near, intermediate and distance vision. 

  • This lens is the best option if your goal is to be completely glasses free and you have no other eye problems

  • This lens tends to produce the most glare and halos around lights, so if these symptoms are particularly bothersome then it may not be the best option. 

  • Multifocal lenses are not covered by your insurance as it's considered cosmetic in nature to eliminate glasses but it may reduce the cost of glasses for the rest of your lifetime. 

​If you can answer the following questions, then your doctor can help guide you to an appropriate lens selection:

  1. Do you mind wearing glasses for distance?

  2. Do you mind wearing glasses for up close?

  3. Would you be willing to pay out of pocket to reduce your reliance on glasses?

  4. How much do glare and halos bother you before surgery?